PHOENIX (AP) — Sunday, June 23

On this date in 1844, Mary Bernard Aguirre was born in St. Louis, Mo. She married Ephifanio Aguirre, a Santa Fe trader, and came with him to Tucson where she became one of the first school teachers, and the mother of several sons who became prominent in mining and ranching in southern Arizona.

On this date in 1881, a barrel of whiskey exploded in a Tombstone saloon starting a fire which destroyed the business section of the town.

On this date in 1906, the final survey was completed for the narrow gauge railway from Patagonia to Mowry. It was reported the engineers then planned to go to Salero to survey a line from Salero to Calabasas.

On this date in 1926, Aimee Semple McPherson, a colorful Los Angeles evangelist who had been missing since May 18, ended a two-state search when she staggered into Douglas with a tale of kidnapping, torture, ransom demands and imprisonment somewhere in the desert.

On this date in 2013, aerialist Nik Wallenda completed a tightrope walk that took him a quarter-mile (0.4 kilometer) over the Little Colorado River Gorge in northeastern Arizona. Wallenda performed the stunt on a 2-inch (5-centimeter)-thick steel cable, 1,500 feet (457 meters) above the river on the Navajo Nation near the Grand Canyon.

Monday, June 24

On this date in 1874, the first woman postmistress in Arizona was appointed at Walnut in Yavapai County.

On this date in 1888, Kingman was destroyed by fire.

On this date in 1902, Charles D. Poston, "Father of Arizona," died in poverty in Phoenix.

On this date in 1910, five Papago Indians were seriously burned during the observance of San Juan's Day near Menager's Oasis. A large quantity of explosive powder was accidentally ignited, injuring three children and two adults.

Tuesday, June 25

On this date in 1895, the Peralta-Reavis claims to 12,750,000 (5,159,854 hectares) acres of land in Arizona and New Mexico were declared fraudulent by the U.S. District Court in Santa Fe. James A. Reavis was later convicted of perjury and sentenced to two years in the penitentiary.

Wednesday, June 26

On this date in 1869, Leopoldo Carrillo opened Arizona's first commercial ice cream saloon in Tucson.

On this date in 1933, Tucson bakers raised the price of pound loaves of bread from eight to nine cents.

Thursday, June 27

On this date in 1881, 15 tons (14 metric tons) of gunpowder exploded in Zeckendorf's powder magazine at the edge of Tucson, smashing windows and dishes and damaging buildings all over town. Churches were quickly filled with people who feared the end of the world was at hand.

On this date in 1921, a fire destroyed the mining town of Oatman with the loss estimated at $500,000.

On this date in 1926, a shoulder blade of a huge prehistoric animal was discovered at Arivaca.

Friday, June 28

On this date in 1888, The Phoenix Herald announced the arrival of 16 ostriches, delivered to M.E. Clanton who was establishing a local ostrich farm.

On this date in 1909, the Tucson Citizen reported that a masked bandit held up a street car at the main gate of the University of Arizona and took a gold watch and $15 in cash from the passengers.

On this date in 1965, Ross Santee, cowboy artists and author, died in Globe at the age of 76.

Saturday, June 29

On this date in 1907, a fire destroyed 80 buildings in the Mexican section of Bisbee, leaving 600 people homeless.

On this date in 1916, the first Arizona chapter of the American Red Cross was organized in Phoenix.

On this date in 2008, two medical helicopters ferrying patients to Flagstaff Medical Center collide near the hospital, killing all seven people aboard the aircraft.

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