Butt fumble forever!

On Saturday, the Trib sports section featured a column, “NFL Language: From Hail Mary to Pick-6.” Simmi Buttar and Barry Wilner wrote about check-downs and hard counts, icing the kicker and the shotgun, the scoop and score and the blitz. I scanned the list once, twice and a third time, and thought to myself: “What about ‘butt fumble?’ ”

It’s an understandable oversight. Maybe Buttar and Wilner are Jets fans. Maybe they’re related to Mark Sanchez. But who could forget Thanksgiving 2012 when Sanchez took the pigskin from under center, missed the handoff, then tucked it and ran, only to slam into the derriere of offensive lineman Brandon Moore, which jarred the ball loose and created the opportunity for New England’s Steve Gregory to scoop and score for six? Gregory took it to the house! On that historic day “butt fumble” became part of the language of football.

Hook and Ladder, Statue of Liberty and Flea Flicker are other notable omissions. But butt fumble forever! It’s a term every football fan needs in his or her lexicon to best describe the action.

Benjamin A. Simpson, Woodway

Gone and forgotten

The Waco Tornado of 1953: I know somewhere out there a good documentary film made by the City of Waco exists. Yet the 1953 Waco Tornado has mostly been forgotten. Yet take time and look closely while downtown, especially north and east of Magnolia Silos, and you can still see grim reminders of that horrific day. For years Waco held the record for most people killed in a tornado in the United States. Damage exceeded $58 million in 1950s money.

Dan Dayton, West

Beneath the bridge

Regarding Ashley Bean Thornton’s column on removal of the I-35 pedestrian bridge: I too will miss its presence but for the very reason she finds it so repugnant. That overpass offers a tremendous venue for life, especially the lives of unborn babies in the womb. Arguing for women’s right to choose is a very tired argument when it excludes the life that a woman carries in her womb, regardless of how that life began.

Yes, a woman’s control of “her” body is almost limitless. She may train for and run a marathon as she may also tattoo, body pierce or shave her head. However, those rights end where the life of another begins. Women can always “make the decision that is best for them (you)” but when there is a pregnancy attached to that decision, another life must be considered as well.

“Ending a pregnancy” cannot be sugarcoated. Abortion is the taking of another life, a life that began at conception. Anti-abortion activists on that overpass are very conscious of and sympathetic to the pregnant women who pass beneath and the all-important decision that confronts them regarding that other life they are carrying in their womb. They are prayed for and cared for, regardless of the decision they make.

Bob Lehman, Menard