Following the announcement of Ascension Providence’s brand unification, I want to share the excitement of our physicians, nurses, other caregivers, associates and leaders to incorporate the name of Ascension — one of the nation’s leading nonprofit health systems — into our brand identity. Providence has been part of Ascension since its founding in 1999, and this transition now identifies our health system with resources including 2,500 sites of care and 36,000 healthcare providers in 21 states and Washington, D.C.

PARIS — Since my family and I arrived for a visit Sunday morning, we’d spent a lot of time outside Notre Dame without actually entering, deterred by long lines. Instead, we’d been holding out our arms for pigeons in the hope they’d land on them and taking video of the Palm Sunday procession that came through the square, with bishops and a cardinal in his bright red robes waving palm fronds. The bells had rung crazily, joyfully. Years ago, I had sat by myself on a bench, brought nearly to tears by gratefulness for this structure that had watched Paris through centuries of life.

U.S. senator and presidential candidate Bernie Sanders recently released his health-care plan, which he calls “Medicare for All.” With a name like that, one would think that the proposal involves extending the Medicare system, which provides health-care insurance to the elderly, to all Americans. But Sanders’ plan is something different. It would outlaw most forms of private health insurance and eliminate all out-of-pocket costs — something that Medicare doesn’t now do.

CNN reports, “For the first time ‘No Religion’ has topped a survey of Americans’ religious identity, according to a new analysis by a political scientist. The non-religious edged out Catholics and evangelicals in the long-running General Social Survey.” Ryan Burge, a political scientist at Eastern Illinois University and a Baptist pastor, found that 23.1% of Americans identify as “No Religion.” In the survey, 23 percent say they are Catholic and 22.5 percent say they are evangelical Christians.

“We have seen what we thought was unseeable,” the astronomer said, like someone who knows history’s ear is pressed against the door. He stood in the hushed attention of the room in Washington as he called up the image on the screen behind him. You know it by now: a smoke ring, an orange doughnut, a blurry circlet of light closed around a profound darkness. By the end of the day, it would be familiar to millions of people as the first photo ever taken of a black hole.

Tax Day, April 15, is a day all dread or like, but another way of looking at it is April 19: Tax Freedom Day. That is roughly the time of year by which an employee will have made the money he or she must pay in taxes. Everything else earned afterward is the amount the worker gets to keep.

It’s almost here, the day most Americans dread above all others: April 15, when income tax returns must be filed. As you read this millions of people are furiously crunching numbers in a frantic game of beat the clock, rushing to get their forms off to Uncle Sam in time.

Plans are afoot to scrap or circumvent the Electoral College as America’s vehicle for electing presidents. Beware: The unintended consequences could be dire. The current system turns each state’s boundaries into a firebreak, preventing corrupt, incompetent or unpopular election procedures from becoming uncontrollable infernos — nationwide Florida 2000-style interminable disputes, litigation and compromised legitimacy of presidents.

While every April 15 is an important day for the American taxpayer, this one holds special attention. That’s because the 2018 tax year was the first under a new tax law Congress and the administration passed — and the real effect of that law for small business has finally become clear.

Few topics are more difficult to have an honest conversation about than race. In 1997, President Bill Clinton created an initiative that started a national conversation about race. It was an ambitious agenda, yet one that offered hope that America could truly begin the process of racial healing. Fast forward to 2019 and we find the dialogue on race continuing this week at the LBJ Presidential Library in Austin with its Summit on Race in America. Although the discussion has been national in focus, the conference provides Texans a unique opportunity to reflect on the state of race relations in our own state.

The electricity grid that services most of Texas, which is managed by the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), got almost 19 percent of its electricity from wind last year. That is an amazing fact in a state that is legendary for oil and gas. But despite wind energy’s dramatic expansion to become the No. 3 (soon to be No. 2) supplier of Texas electricity, not everyone is a fan. In fact, two pieces of legislation under consideration by Texas lawmakers, House Bill 2908 and Senate Bill 2232, would take some of the wind out of wind power’s sail.

The Trump administration is so corrupt that its answer to ethics scandals is to replace disgraced officials with lobbyists and executives to oversee the industry they used to represent. Of course, calling corporate lobbyists a solution to corruption is like saying rotten eggs are the solution to that moldy smell in your kitchen — they are only going exacerbate an already bad situation.

Much of the world is laughing at the United States. Dictators smirk because the foremost liberal democracy has produced President Donald Trump. Adversaries rejoice because he is dismantling alliances that kept them in check for 50 years. Europe giggles uneasily as tweetstorms put into question the judgment of the man in charge of their military safety.

Shadow has fallen across the future of autonomous transportation, one of the key aspects of the city of the future and of the widespread use of artificial intelligence. It comes from Boeing in the form of the computer problem that has grounded the world’s fleet of 737 Max 8 aircraft.

Last year in Wayfair v. South Dakota, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed Texas and the other states to collect their sales tax on Internet sales even when the vendor has no physical presence in the state. Texas had been losing significant revenue under the old rule that said that out-of-state vendors had to have a “brick-and-mortar” store or warehouse in Texas before they could be forced to collect sales tax.

Educators and administrators at institutions like Texas State Technical College are motivated by a common goal: to prepare our students for rewarding careers and, in doing so, to help them live the lives they want to live. In short, we’re working to help Texas thrive.

On occasion of Commemoration of the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam War, the following reflects how fathers, mothers and wives struggled through unbelievable pain to accept their losses as casualty reports were relayed to the American home front. Consider Michael Lee Dewlen, Baylor University 1967 graduate from Amarillo. He was Vietnam War casualty number 29,458.

Very little was surprising about the conclusion of the special counsel’s investigation. For one thing, it wasn’t surprising that Robert Mueller’s probe prompted great commotion — a federal investigation involving a sitting president is a momentous event, and concluding it, a historic moment. And most, but not all, of the details in the attorney general’s letter of “principal conclusions” were unsurprising as well.

The mass killing at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, carries one lesson for everyone. Nobody is safe. White-skinned nationalists are as likely to kill as Middle Eastern terrorists. In this wicked world, they’ve carried out some of the bloodiest massacres in recent years from the United States to Norway and now New Zealand.

Foreign authoritarian powers are undermining democracy worldwide and I can’t help making parallels to the wizarding world of Harry Potter. Much like a triumphant West after the Cold War, many in the Potter-verse had believed Lord Voldemort — the main antagonist in the series — was defeated. Unbeknownst to them, the dark wizard was hiding in plain sight, reshaping influential institutions, manipulating political leaders and engineering fake news.

Americans, collectively, appear to be in a deeper funk about the future than Beto O’Rourke was after he lost his Senate race. When adults are asked to think about what the United States will be like in 2050, they see the country declining in stature on the world stage, a widening gap between the haves and the have-nots and growing political polarization. They think health care will be less affordable, public education will be lower quality and retiring will be harder.

Sixteen years ago on March 20, 2003, the United States invaded Iraq. After a months-long propaganda campaign the likes of which the country had never seen, a majority of Americans supported going to war. After all, the Bush administration had told them over and over that it was an act of self-preservation, for if we didn’t invade, then Saddam Hussein, who probably had something to do with 9/11, would attack us with his fearsome arsenal of weapons of mass destruction.

As Democratic candidates for president seek to win the hearts of the primary electorate, they’re not just proposing ambitious policy ideas. They’re also trying to show that they envision a Democratic Party that’s tougher than the one that exists today. And one of the ways some of them are doing so is by considering expanding the size of the Supreme Court.

The much-anticipated dedication of the City of West Fallen Heroes Memorial Saturday offered much worthy of praise, including an appropriate speech about sacrifice, loss and resilience by Gov. Greg Abbott, complete with admiration for “the remarkable work the people of West have done to rebuild this community.” But the centerpiece was quite obviously missing. Because of thunderstorms, this engaging hometown memorial — complete with informatively written individual tributes to those who perished in the West Fertilizer Company ammonium nitrate explosion of April 17, 2013 — could be conjured indoors only through a hastily but astonishingly well-produced video of the memorial, complete with scene-setting drone footage, by West videographer Ben Ranzinger.

PARIS — Since my family and I arrived for a visit Sunday morning, we’d spent a lot of time outside Notre Dame without actually entering, deterred by long lines. Instead, we’d been holding out our arms for pigeons in the hope they’d land on them and taking video of the Palm Sunday procession that came through the square, with bishops and a cardinal in his bright red robes waving palm fronds. The bells had rung crazily, joyfully. Years ago, I had sat by myself on a bench, brought nearly to tears by gratefulness for this structure that had watched Paris through centuries of life.

Flashback

What were we talking about one year ago? Take a look back.

Time and time again, President Donald Trump and his associates have talked themselves into legal trouble. Trump’s splenetic tweets about foreigners were quoted in court opinions blocking his immigration initiatives. When Trump proclaimed he had no idea that his attorney Michael Cohen had paid adult-film actress Stormy Daniels for her silence, her lawyers cheered — the president had just handed them a very plausible argument that the nondisclosure agreement she signed with Cohen was unenforceable.