Mark Wahlberg’s “Mile 22 “ character James Silva has a tick where he snaps a yellow rubber bracelet against his wrist. He does this many, many times throughout this all-out assault of a movie, which seems to have been shot and edited with the singular purpose of leaving the audience confused and disoriented at every turn.

In 1979, a man named Ron Stallworth who was the first African-American police officer and detective in the Colorado Springs Police Department also became a card-carrying member of the Ku Klux Klan and the leader of the local chapter. He would send a white co-worker to play him for in-person meetings as part of the wild undercover operation, but Stallworth was the one on the phone, insisting his hatred for non-white races with everyone from the local chapter members to the KKK’s “grand wizard” David Duke himself.

Despite a similar title, “Christopher Robin” is in no way to be confused with “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” last fall’s soberly fact-based drama about the relationship between “Winnie-the-Pooh” author A.A. Milne and his son. (Christopher Robin Milne, as you may remember, was the inspiration for the famous stuffed bear’s human companion, a small British boy called Christopher Robin.)

When it comes to superhero movies, there’s a perception that you’ve got to choose between DC’s gritty, dour offerings or Marvel’s winking humor. But five cartoon wannabe heroes armed with fart jokes are trying to change that.

“The Rider,” a marvelous film by Chloé Zhao, tells the story of rodeo horseman Brady Blackburn, who, after suffering a near-fatal head injury after being stepped on by a bucking bronco, must find his place within a world where the phrase “ride or die” takes on real, high-stakes meaning.

When Melissa McCarthy, as the newly divorced, 40-something mom Deanna in “Life of the Party,” decides to re-enroll in college, my seatmate at a recent screening turned to me with a question about McCarthy’s choice of major: “What the heck is she going to do with a degree in archaeology?”

Viewers may be forgiven for being confused by Wes Anderson’s movies. Constructed with dollhouse fastidiousness, their hyper-symmetrical, squared-off tableaus dressed with gorgeous textures and color palettes — and their clipped dialogue delivered with deadpan sincerity — they depict a universe with only glancing resemblance to the real world.

“Paul, Apostle of Christ” comes from Sony Pictures Entertainment’s Affirm label, an offshoot that has produced such Christian-themed dramas as “Heaven is for Real,” “Soul Surfer” and “Risen.” Less interested in blunt proselytizing than more open-ended explorations of faith and its challenges, Affirm films have gratifyingly avoided the kind of pietistic Sunday-school pageantry that characterizes so many motion pictures of the genre.

The first feature from writer-director Cory Finley, “Thoroughbreds” is a darkly comic tale — shot through with the hard-boiled fatalism of film noir — about two teenage girls in an affluent Connecticut suburb of New York.

With its title tongue-in-cheekily evoking “I, Claudius,” another epic tale of madness and debauchery, the dramatic comedy “I, Tonya” revisits — with verve, intelligence, scathing humor and more than a touch of sadness — the bizarre 1994 attack on figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, by goons associated with the camp of Kerrigan’s athletic rival, Tonya Harding.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

Less a movie than a conjuring, “The Shape of Water” plunges viewers into a mossy, aquamarine world of dreams and taboo desires, its contours as a wistful fable adjusted more than slightly for very real, present-day concerns.

Could it be that Hugh Grant was born to play a villainous dandy in a kid’s movie? He certainly seems to be having the time of his life hamming it up in “Paddington 2” as a pretentious, has-been actor who’s now relegated to dressing up like a spaniel for dog food commercials. His delight is contagious.

Until this year, perhaps the greatest piece of moviemaking about Dunkirk was only part of a movie: It was a breathtaking sequence of the massive World War II evacuation, filmed in one astonishing five-minute take that dramatically punctuated the movie “Atonement,” directed by Joe Wright.

You know how Hollywood doesn’t make original movies anymore? Well, “Downsizing” is here to fix that. Weird and wonderful, zigging where it should zag and zagging where it should zig, this wildly imaginative flight of fancy strikes an admirably poised balance between whimsy, screwball comedy, social satire and generous meditation on the foibles and highest aspirations of human nature.

Waco movie multiplexes fill with horror movies as Halloween approaches and the next few days will see smaller screens at the Waco Hippodrome and McLennan Community College get into the act, one with an annual horror movie festival, the other with Waco’s own zombie film from 2008.

The title “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House” seems a built-in spoiler, but a film simply with the name of a crucial whistleblower — or leaker — in the Watergate scandal likely wouldn’t have attracted audience interest. Mark Felt? Who?

Legos were invented in 1949. The character of Batman, 10 years before that. “The Lego Movie” (2014) and this year’s “The Lego Batman Movie” riffed brilliantly on those storied histories — simultaneously mocking and honoring pop subcultures that have grown organically around millions of acts of individual imagination spurred on, in the first case, by building blocks, and in the second case, by comic books, TV shows, movies and, eventually, Batman-themed Lego minifigs (or minifigures) and construction sets.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

There’s a reason that Stephen King’s 1986 novel about a demonic clown who terrorizes a group of children is called “It” and not “Him.” In King’s tale, which is now a feature film, it’s not the bogeyman, but fear itself — that ephemeral, foglike, ungraspable emotion — that haunts its pages. Oh, there’s a monster in the new movie — you’d have to be living under a rock not to have caught a glimpse of Pennywise the Dancing Clown in your Twitter feed lately — but he (or, rather, it) is never one thing, taking on the form of whatever scares you the most.

If we have learned anything from the Cooking Channel, it’s that talent isn’t defined by the ingredients you use but what you do with them. By that measure, director David F. Sandberg is an alchemist of the first order, taking the base — even leaden — components of horror and whipping them into a shivery chiffon of dread.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

In “Detroit,” director Kathryn Bigelow concentrates and refracts the 1967 riots in that eponymous city through the lens of one of its most notorious yet largely forgotten incidents, when a group of white police officers tortured and murdered a group of teenagers at the Algiers Motel, then covered it up.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

“Wish Upon” revives the Orientalist mysticism at the heart of the teen-friendly “Gremlins”— an enigmatic Asian artifact leads to mayhem and murder — but it’s nowhere as entertaining as the 1984 horror classic.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

Salma Hayek is virtually unrecognizable in “Beatriz at Dinner,” a sad-eyed parable in which she plays a massage therapist and healer in Southern California whose car breaks down at the home of a wealthy client, pushing her into an Alice-like plunge through the looking glass of race and class, friendship and professionalism, and liberal earnestness and hypocrisy.

Waco film fans who’ve itched to see the richer visuals and sound of an IMAX presentation no longer have to drive to Temple’s Premiere Cinema for the nearest screen. As some filmgoers to AMC Classic Galaxy 16 started discovering late last month, that multiplex now has an IMAX screen. The theater, formerly known as Starplex Galaxy 16, now officially is AMC Classic Galaxy 16.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), Starplex Galaxy 16 (SG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

An ode to food, France, film and flirtation, “Paris Can Wait” is a creamy but not entirely disposable bonbon of a movie.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), Starplex Galaxy 16 (SG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

Anyone expecting the movie “It Comes at Night” to live up — or, rather, to live down — to the self-consciously cheesy promise of its name, which hints at the kind of nocturnal boogeyman who has haunted so many horror films before it, must be unfamiliar with the work of its writer and director, Trey Edward Shults.