Dallas artist Erika Huddleston found Waco Creek continually surprised her in the seven months she painted the stream, disappearing from public view at times, resurfacing in hard concrete channels at others.

If the windows of some downtown Waco storefronts seem artsier than usual this month, it’s intentional, thanks to the second appearance of Central Texas Artists’ Collective “Ekphrasis” art show.

Western artists Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell did much to shape the public’s imagination of the American West through their illustrations, paintings and sculpture, but they shouldn’t be seen as mirror images, said Western art scholar B. Byron Price.

A Clifton painter’s look at scenes of Western life captured in oil paint and an informative look at print making with examples drawn from Baylor University’s Martin Museum of Art open the summer for two Waco art galleries.

Waco artist Kermit Oliver becomes the official Texas State Two-Dimensional Artist for 2017 on Thursday when the Texas State Legislature makes appointments to four state artist positions, but don’t expect the accomplished painter to toot his horn in self-congratulation, even if the honor puts him in the company of fellow state artists George Strait and Marcia Ball.

Since graduating from Baylor University as a University Scholar in 2004, artist Jen Dunlap has lived in New York for about 10 years, then Los Angeles with some five cross-country trips and several Waco visits in that time.

The creative and inspirational sides of art gets employed in service to others Monday night with the third annual Wild Torch, a fundraiser for Jesus Said Love, a nonprofit organization that works with women in the sex industry.

New Mexican artist Katherine McDermott will show works inspired by spring in her show “Everything’s Coming Up Flowers: An Artistic Expression of the Promise of Spring,” which opens during First Friday activities from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday at Papillon Antiques, 1025 Austin Ave.

The holiday break offers a chance to travel out of town, and while most day trips to Dallas, Fort Worth, Austin and beyond involve shopping (at least before Christmas), those destinations do have touring art exhibits that some may want to see. Here’s a quick overview of some notable shows.

French painter Claude Monet became one of the world’s leading artists of the late 18th and early 20th centuries thanks to his skill in capturing the shifting light of sky, water and landscape, but there’s more to the Impressionist’s work than first impressions might suggest.

An airport can be something of a welcome mat to a city, one that gives you a feel for what, if any, kind of distinctive cultural experience you’ve got coming on your visit there. Some airports, however, simply can’t do it. DFW, for example, has no character at all: Upon arriving there (apart from the gift shops bursting with Dallas and Texas merchandise), one doesn’t find any cultural cues to let you know you’re in Texas, let alone in a particular major city.

The welcome mat to downtown Waco goes out on multiple corners Friday night as a new Welcome to Waco pop-up festival overlaps with downtown’s First Friday emphasis and a three-day Silobration at the Magnolia Market.

The Waco Cultural Arts Festival opens its 13th annual celebration of the arts and creativity this weekend in Indian Spring Park and neighboring Waco Convention Center, continuing its long-running tradition of diversity with hands-on art activities for kids and grown-ups, live music and dance performances, poetry, workshops, artist market, film, science demonstrations, food and drink.

Dallas-area painter Caroline Camden Lewis may have descriptive notes for the abstract paintings in her Art Center of Waco exhibit “While I Breathe, I Hope,” but those stories followed the wordless impulse and emotions that her works express.