Rain dripping, ocean waves crashing on the shore, river rapids, even the silent fluttering of butterflies — all make music to Waco musician Sandi Horton, who translates them into a different music when she composes.

Printing limitations and cost drove comic book artists to strong colors, less subtlety and bold lines to tell their stories. The pop art movement that arose in the 1960s used the limited palette and bold graphics of mass media and advertising to catch eyes and make a statement in art galleries.

Writer and director Boots Riley’s crackling first film “Sorry to Bother You” may just be the craziest movie of the year. Fierce, provocative and bold, it’s a challenging social statement about race and capitalism wrapped in a colorful, magical realist coating that will leave your head spinning. It is not perfect — far from it — and really goes off the rails at the end, but its ideas and impact are undeniable.

Those looking to visit noteworthy out-of-town museum and gallery shows can take in a new exhibit of rarely seen dinosaur fossils and replicas opening this weekend in Dallas while a San Antonio show of Egyptian animal mummies heads toward its close.

It’s the sort of family reunion that makes one squirm to live through or, if on the outside, laugh at the familiarity of it: The child who returns to a smaller hometown after life in the big city.

Waco’s Juneteenth Family Fun Day, already one of the state’s larger Juneteenth celebrations, expands into an Extravaganza this year, with three days of activities and performances by the platinum-selling ’90s soul and hip-hop group Dru Hill and gospel singer Myron Butler.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — If the term “outlaw country” evokes images of Willie Nelson’s hippie braids or Waylon Jennings’ “Honky Tonk Heroes,” then you’ll want to see a new museum exhibit offering a deeper look at the poets, pickers and characters that revolutionized country music in the 1970s.

“The Rider,” a marvelous film by Chloé Zhao, tells the story of rodeo horseman Brady Blackburn, who, after suffering a near-fatal head injury after being stepped on by a bucking bronco, must find his place within a world where the phrase “ride or die” takes on real, high-stakes meaning.

A milestone birthday merits something special. That’s why Texas country musician and Waco native Wade Bowen is changing some things for his annual Bowen MusicFest, which turns 20 this Sunday.

The Memorial Day weekend kicks off summer travels for many families, some of whom might be looking for a museum or art gallery visit to work into a city visit.

Spring, as Ted Nugent might put it, is the time when great shaggy beasts shake off winter’s sluggishness and, with hot blood pumping through their veins, go forth to stalk the land.

Predicting May weather in Waco for the annual Pints in the Park is a gambler’s game, but the remaining elements of Saturday’s edition — Texas barbecue, beer and live honky-tonk music — surely rate as a Texas trifecta.

When Melissa McCarthy, as the newly divorced, 40-something mom Deanna in “Life of the Party,” decides to re-enroll in college, my seatmate at a recent screening turned to me with a question about McCarthy’s choice of major: “What the heck is she going to do with a degree in archaeology?”

Shotgun Rider, the Texas duo of Logan Samford and Anthony Enriquez, knows the task ahead — building a base in Texas and beyond — means introducing fans to two distinctives, the band’s West Texas-lonesome sound and its name.