On a muggy Fourth of July night just outside Austin, Rep. Beto O’Rourke walked on stage wearing a light blue button-down, with a Texas-size American flag in the background. But rather than one of his campaign rallies in his Senate bid against Republican Ted Cruz, the Democrat was in front of the thousands that came out for Willie Nelson’s Fourth of July Picnic, an annual celebration of country music started by the legendary singer 45 years ago.

It’s easy to see why someone would want to make a movie about Ricky Wershe Jr. His life story, the inspiration for the new, fact-based crime drama “White Boy Rick,” has it all: drugs, sex and gunrunning, plus a main character whose neck-deep involvement in all those activities — while still a teenager — is both shocking and appealingly guileless.

Hispanic contributions to Waco history and culture get recognized this month as the Art Forum of Waco reopens to host the exhibit “Hispanic Heritage,” complete with an appearance by a descendent of Waco founder Jacob de Cordova at Friday’s artist reception.

Singer-songwriter John Mark McMillan explains the “Body + Ghost Tour” that brings him and two other bands to Waco’s Common Grounds on Friday night suggests the interplay between flesh and spirit that’s always intrigued him.

Noted Irish poet Micheal O’Siadhail will share excepts from his sprawling, new release “The Five Quintets” in a public reading at 4:30 p.m. Monday at Baylor University’s Armstrong-Browning Library. A book signing will follow his reading.

“God Bless the Broken Road,” named for a song made famous by Rascal Flatts, is a well-meaning, competently made faith-based drama. But good intentions and a diverse cast aren’t enough to spread the gospel beyond moviegoers already invested in God (and country music and NASCAR). And it’s unfortunate that the tribute to veterans that is so much a part of the movie’s marketing turns out to be little more than a framing device that’s dispensed with for most of the plot.

The insane revenge movie “Peppermint” starts to make a lot more sense when you realize that it was directed by the man who brought us “Taken” (Pierre Morel) and written by one at least partially responsible for “London Has Fallen” (Chad St. John). It’s a movie in which the central character, Riley North (Jennifer Garner), is called a “female vigilante” by a local news anchor, and a “soccer mom” by Los Angeles police. She uses a maxi pad as a makeshift bandage to sop up the blood from a gushing knife wound and may have a higher body count than John Wick by the end of the film.

Audiences attending the opening performances of Waco Civic Theatre’s production of “Newsies” this weekend may notice the wider toilet stalls in the bathrooms, the carpeting on the lobby floor and a new ramp connecting parking lot to sidewalk.

Newspapers, unions and strikes seem unlikely subjects for a Broadway musical, but the combination — with heavy doses of music and choreography — proved winning enough to make “Newsies” a stage hit when it debuted on Broadway in 2012.

More than two dozen artists use their imagination about a problematic future in the Second Annual Climate Change Art Show on display this month at downtown’s Waco Winery Tasting Room and Rooftop Patio.

Spin Connection, which specializes in selling vinyl audio albums both current and vintage, marks its second anniversary of hosting live bands with a rock-driven party Saturday complete with kids’ games, prize giveaways and cotton candy.

Participants and supporters of the “1,000 Hopes For Waco” mural at 315 S. University Parks Drive will meet Tuesday to celebrate the project and start a hope of their own: a push on social media with the mural as backdrop for 1,000 selfies.

Comic William Lee Martin still answers to Cowboy Bill, the nickname a grandfather gave to him, but the salty language that once peppered his routines no longer is something he hangs his hat on.

The Music Association of Central Texas recently installed its Hall of Recognition plaques into a hallway outside the Raleigh restaurant at the Waco Hippodrome.

Despite a similar title, “Christopher Robin” is in no way to be confused with “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” last fall’s soberly fact-based drama about the relationship between “Winnie-the-Pooh” author A.A. Milne and his son. (Christopher Robin Milne, as you may remember, was the inspiration for the famous stuffed bear’s human companion, a small British boy called Christopher Robin.)

Work by world-famous British street artist Banksy will come to Waco’s Cultivate 7twelve art space this September in a multimedia event organizers say will boost Waco’s arts profile and provide a catalyst for arts conversations.

On the menu: Wraps, salads, waffles, fresh cold-pressed vegetable and fruit juices, smoothies.

Rain dripping, ocean waves crashing on the shore, river rapids, even the silent fluttering of butterflies — all make music to Waco musician Sandi Horton, who translates them into a different music when she composes.

Printing limitations and cost drove comic book artists to strong colors, less subtlety and bold lines to tell their stories. The pop art movement that arose in the 1960s used the limited palette and bold graphics of mass media and advertising to catch eyes and make a statement in art galleries.