A McLennan County grand jury returned 48 new indictments Wednesday in the May 17 Twin Peaks shootout between rival biker groups.

Courthouse records show that 48 indictments were returned on first-degree charges of engaging in organized criminal activity, and a source said six of the 48 were sealed, meaning the people indicted have not yet been arrested. Including the 48 indictments Wednesday, 154 people have now been indicted in connection to the deadly shootout.

While McLennan County District Attorney Abel Reyna released a statement Wednesday afternoon about the grand jury’s actions, he refused to speak to the Tribune-Herald about the new biker cases.

“From this point, these cases will be assigned to a court, and an arraignment date will be set for each case. This is an ongoing investigation and will continue,” Reyna’s statement read.

The same grand jury returned 106 indictments in November that charged bikers who were at Twin Peaks that day with engaging in organized criminal activity. The grand jury’s term was extended by 90 days in December to continue reviewing the Twin Peaks cases.

The grand jury’s term expires at the end of March, and no new date was set Wednesday for it to return.

Police arrested 177 bikers after the Twin Peaks melee. It was unclear Wednesday whether Reyna’s office will pursue charges against those bikers who were arrested but are yet to be indicted.

There were no no-bills — or cases a grand jury declines to indict — reported to the district clerk’s office after Wednesday’s grand jury session.

Nine bikers were killed and more than two dozen were wounded during the shootout.

Unlike the first round of identical indictments, which alleged 10 bikers were killed in the incident, the new indictments issued Wednesday corrected the mistake and allege nine people died. Also, a biker whose name was misspelled in the first round of indictments, who was alleged to have been wounded, has been omitted from the list of wounded in the new indictments.

Engaging in organized criminal activity is a first-degree felony punishable by a minimum of 15 years in prison and up to life.

Tribune-Herald staff writer Kristin Hoppa contributed to this story.

Recommended for you