cricket ra

Waco’s annual field cricket season will end once a freeze or two arrives.

Staff photo— Rod Aydelotte

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Crickets are back.

“We go through this, to some extent, every year,” said Richard Duhrkopf, Baylor University insect researcher and associate biology professor.

Waco’s annual field cricket season will end once a freeze or two arrives, Duhrkopf said.

“They’re attracted by bright lights,” he said. “They flock toward the light and they mate. The females will go back and lay their eggs in the soil, and the eggs will stay there until next spring and become baby crickets in the spring and grow all summer long and do it again.”

Cricket season is in full swing, said Fred Huffman, president and owner of GGA Pest Management Services in Waco.

“Sometimes they’ll start in August, but it seems like, really, right now within the last couple of weeks and this week, it’s been more and more,” Huffman said.

Exclusion is the best way to keep crickets out of homes, apartments and businesses, he said.

That means filling holes in buildings and making sure weather stripping covers cracks in doors and windows.

Duhrkopf recommends reducing light visibility by drawing the drapes and not lighting backyards and surrounding areas. Birds, lizards and frogs also eat crickets, he said.

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Other cricket facts

Male crickets make chirping sounds to attract mates.

One female cricket can lay between 150 and 400 eggs in the fall.

Crickets are omnivorous and feed at night.

Dead crickets cause a stench.

Sources: Texas A&M University and Penn State University

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