The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology will conduct the genetic testing necessary to identify victims of the Mount Carmel fire. Justice of the Peace David Pareya of West said he received word Friday afternoon.

DNA samples could be taken this week from suspected relatives of the 42 unknown Branch Davidians who died April 19, Pareya said. Those samples will be tested against DNA taken from the fire victims.

The testing will be done at the AFIP in Washington, D.C., at the federal government’s expense.

“The experience and educational benefits derived from this joint effort will greatly assist the AFIP in future mass disasters,” Dr. Edward Martin, acting assistant secretary of defense, wrote in a letter to McLennan County officials.

Read the Tribune-Herald's 7-part investigative series on the inner workings of the Branch Davidians. Hours after Part Two appeared in print, the ATF raided the group's compound.

Read the Tribune-Herald’s account of the ATF raid on the Branch Davidian compound on Feb. 28, 1993. Four ATF agents and six in the compound were killed in the gunfight.

Read the daily news accounts of the 51-day siege at the Branch Davidian compound near Elk, which began Feb. 28 and lasted until April.

Read the accounts of April 19 and beyond: FBI agents began inserting canisters of tear gas into the Branch Davidian compound in the early morning hours. By noon, it was on fire.

Federal officials left the compound site in late May 1993. As identifications of bodies continued, questions about the survivors, the compound and the cult itself began to emerge.

As the world began to take a critical look back at the events and legal proceedings continue, the ATF's bombshell report forces a shakeup at the top after the raid gone "tragically wrong."

The 1987 Rodenville shootout and trial, the end of the world in 1959 and more coming soon.