If artwork could get motion sickness, two of the first exhibits at downtown Waco’s Cultivate 7twelve gallery likely could qualify for some Dramamine.

The title “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House” seems a built-in spoiler, but a film simply with the name of a crucial whistleblower — or leaker — in the Watergate scandal likely wouldn’t have attracted audience interest. Mark Felt? Who?

Silobration may now rival Baylor Homecoming in its visitor-drawing power, pulling more than 20,000 people to downtown Waco over its three-day run, but it doesn’t have a parade, a football game or thousands of friendships that get renewed each year — the latter being the true heart of Homecoming.

A little more than two years ago, Texas country/Red Dirt singer-songwriter Stoney LaRue asked fans for suggestions of what LaRue favorites they’d like to hear in an album. The result, “Us Time,” proved successful enough, drawing from nearly 20 years of his career, to carry him longer than th…

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

The shopping goes outside Thursday through Saturday at the third annual Silobration at Chip and Joanna Gaines’ Magnolia Market at the Silos, 601 Webster Ave. Evening concerts with Jon Foreman and Johnnyswim on Friday and Saturday have been sold out for weeks, but shopping hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

I often wish we still had our Patrick Dougherty sculpture here in Waco. For those of you who don’t know the name or the story, Dougherty is an acclaimed sculptor whose works are in museums, public parks, university campuses, and botanical gardens all over the world.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

Wooden sculpture from artist Danville Chadbourne goes on display Thursday with the exhibit ”Danville Chadbourne: Retrospective Part IV” at the Martin Museum of Art in Baylor’s Hooper-Schaefer Fine Arts Center. An opening reception will take place from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Thursday.

Those with a sweet tooth for musical theater can get a large dose of song and dance over the next two weeks with a Baylor Theatre production heavy on dance and a Waco Civic Theatre production jammed with song.

The {254} Dance Fest celebrates its sixth year Oct. 6-8 with more than a dozen participating companies, nearly 200 adult and youth dancers and at least one act that tries to defy gravity: an aerial dance demonstration by Austin’s Blue Lapis Light company.

Baylor University’s A Cappella Choir marks the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in the first of two Reformation 500 concerts at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Jones Concert Hall in Baylor’s McCrary Music Building.

I haven’t thought too deeply about why I’m doing it, but I’ve started playing jazz in the classroom before each of my U.S. history survey classes begins. I doubt that many of my students are keeping a running list, but so far they’ve heard Miles Davis, Kenny Burrell, McCoy Tyner, Thelonious Monk, John Coltrane and Duke Ellington.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

Legos were invented in 1949. The character of Batman, 10 years before that. “The Lego Movie” (2014) and this year’s “The Lego Batman Movie” riffed brilliantly on those storied histories — simultaneously mocking and honoring pop subcultures that have grown organically around millions of acts of individual imagination spurred on, in the first case, by building blocks, and in the second case, by comic books, TV shows, movies and, eventually, Batman-themed Lego minifigs (or minifigures) and construction sets.

Justin Furstenfeld, lead singer and songwriter for the alt-rock band Blue October, sounded a little out of breath during a recent phone interview, but it’s for good reason: He’s on his morning walk in San Marcos, where he and his family live, pushing 18-month-old son Gunner in his stroller.

Last spring when I was in New York, I was walking through Madison Square the night I arrived and encountered a striking piece of public art called “Big Bling,” by contemporary sculptor Martin Puryear. It was in the middle of a lawn so you couldn’t just walk right up to it, but I circled it a few times from the pathways, looking at it from different angles, and took some pictures. I initially didn’t know what to make of it, but I liked it.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

Pianist Yekwon Sunwoo faces a busy fall: concerts in New Mexico, Texas, California, Nebraska, Oregon, Kentucky and Colorado. Travel abroad to concerts in Canada, Scotland, South Korea and Lebanon. Performances of works by Brahms, Ravel, Schubert, Rachmaninoff, Debussy, Strauss, Mozart and Bartok. Promotion of the Decca Gold album “Cliburn Gold 2017” containing his performances of Ravel’s “La Valse” and Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Sonata.

First appearances can be deceiving in Vincent Terrell Durham’s play “The Fertile River,” beginning with the title: It’s not about a geographic feature or its agricultural value.

Of all the artists today who incorporate political content into what they do, the most widely known is Ai Weiwei, a Chinese artist born in Beijing in 1957. He knows well the troubles that can plague artists in his homeland. In 1958, his family was sent to a labor camp because his father, an acclaimed poet, had run afoul of the government. A decade later, during Mao’s Cultural Revolution, his father was again censured and forced to be a communal toilet cleaner. Ai left China and lived in the United States from 1981 to 1993.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

There’s a reason that Stephen King’s 1986 novel about a demonic clown who terrorizes a group of children is called “It” and not “Him.” In King’s tale, which is now a feature film, it’s not the bogeyman, but fear itself — that ephemeral, foglike, ungraspable emotion — that haunts its pages. Oh, there’s a monster in the new movie — you’d have to be living under a rock not to have caught a glimpse of Pennywise the Dancing Clown in your Twitter feed lately — but he (or, rather, it) is never one thing, taking on the form of whatever scares you the most.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

For some songwriters, there’s a deeper goal than entertaining and amusing their listeners, a side of the music and lyrics that speak to the soul and spirit.

I first heard their music when I played an arrangement of their tune “Black Cow” in high school jazz band. There was something about its jazzy grove that instantly intrigued me. But I already had my favorite music and was as comfortable in my tastes as any high school student.