At a time when men in Hollywood and halls of power throughout the nation are being called to account for past sexual misconduct, McLennan Community College associate theater professor Elizabeth Talbot’s lessons about on-stage intimacy take on a new resonance.

Much attention has been devoted to this year being the centennial of the U.S. entry into World War I. It’s a date certainly worth commemorating as American participation tipped the balance of that ghastly conflict in favor of the Allied Powers and set the stage for vast changes that shaped the remainder of the 20th century.

Baylor University chairman of museum studies Kenneth Hafertepe will talk about early Texas buildings, including some in Waco, in a Historic Waco Foundation lecture at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Hoffmann House, 810 S. Fourth St. Free and open to the public.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

For the Central Texas Choral Society’s fall concert, director David Guess opted to shift from performance of major choral works to a varied selection of songs drawn from the 5-year-old choir’s past performances.

In May 1917, just a few weeks after the United States entered World War I, a motion picture called “The Spirit of ’76” debuted in Chicago. It was advertised as “a historical romance dealing with the American Revolution and its causes,” and its depiction of the British was particularly negative.

The missed and unseen connections of life form the subject of Baylor Theatre’s “This Random World,” which continues its run with performances at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Baylor’s Hooper-Schaefer Fine Arts Center. $20, $17 for students, faculty, staff.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

When soprano Renee Fleming stands before a full Waco Hall on Tuesday night, she won’t be the only one singing, though the others in the audience will sing just in their hearts and minds.

If the windows of some downtown Waco storefronts seem artsier than usual this month, it’s intentional, thanks to the second appearance of Central Texas Artists’ Collective “Ekphrasis” art show.

Americana singer-songwriter Drew Holcomb looks forward to a return to Common Grounds on Saturday night, the Waco venue that he and his band the Neighbors have called home in recent visits, but it’s not as enticing as what follows later this fall: a two-week tour with Willie Nelson.

If you’re a hunter, you probably don’t need to be reminded that deer season starts here in Texas on Nov. 4. You may even have all your equipment ready to go. While the worlds of hunting and art don’t overlap that often, now is a good time for anyone interested in either to take the short drive up to the Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Ft. Worth to see an exhibit called “Wild Spaces, Open Seasons: Hunting and Fishing in American Art.” It’s one of those exhibits that after you’re about two-thirds of the way through, you begin to realize what a good idea it is.

Waco movie multiplexes fill with horror movies as Halloween approaches and the next few days will see smaller screens at the Waco Hippodrome and McLennan Community College get into the act, one with an annual horror movie festival, the other with Waco’s own zombie film from 2008.

Texas country singer-songwriters Pat Green and Casey Donahew will spend Thursday night in Waco doing what they like best, playing songs and telling stories. And, as they did during a recent Texas Music Takeover tour of London earlier this month, they’ll be doing it together.

“We are all in the gutter,” says the character of Lord Darlington in Oscar Wilde’s 1891 play “Lady Windermere’s Fan,” “but some of us are looking at the stars.” That famous statement begins in good egalitarian fashion, but few lines I know of in literature have such a boffo turnabout contained in them.

The title “Mark Felt: The Man Who Brought Down The White House” seems a built-in spoiler, but a film simply with the name of a crucial whistleblower — or leaker — in the Watergate scandal likely wouldn’t have attracted audience interest. Mark Felt? Who?

Silobration may now rival Baylor Homecoming in its visitor-drawing power, pulling more than 20,000 people to downtown Waco over its three-day run, but it doesn’t have a parade, a football game or thousands of friendships that get renewed each year — the latter being the true heart of Homecoming.

A little more than two years ago, Texas country/Red Dirt singer-songwriter Stoney LaRue asked fans for suggestions of what LaRue favorites they’d like to hear in an album. The result, “Us Time,” proved successful enough, drawing from nearly 20 years of his career, to carry him longer than the usual album tour.

I could tell she was worried as she sat beside me in the car. My 9-year-old daughter was dancing with her group later that afternoon at the Waco Cultural Arts Festival, and as we drove toward Indian Springs Park she was uncharacteristically quiet. After a lengthy silence she finally said softly, “Daddy, I’m nervous.”

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

The shopping goes outside Thursday through Saturday at the third annual Silobration at Chip and Joanna Gaines’ Magnolia Market at the Silos, 601 Webster Ave. Evening concerts with Jon Foreman and Johnnyswim on Friday and Saturday have been sold out for weeks, but shopping hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

I often wish we still had our Patrick Dougherty sculpture here in Waco. For those of you who don’t know the name or the story, Dougherty is an acclaimed sculptor whose works are in museums, public parks, university campuses, and botanical gardens all over the world.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.