The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C., holds the largest collection of presidential portraits in the country, stretching back to some very famous paintings of George Washington, whose birthday is today, Feb. 22. A small part of that collection makes up a popular ongoing exhibit at the gallery called “America’s Presidents.”

Dallas musician Jeff Grossman and his band Saints Eleven make their Waco debut Saturday night as the second band of the annual Zack and Jim Anniversary Blowout, but he’s no stranger to the territory.

While the romance and messages on racism in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “South Pacific” still hold up almost 70 years after its Broadway debut, theaters usually depend on the available talent for their timing.

One of my favorite TV shows growing up was “WKRP in Cincinnati,” which ran for four seasons in the late 1970s and early ‘80s. You may remember it: the show followed the misadventures of a quirky bunch running an album-rock AM radio station in Cincinnati. A couple of episodes were among the funniest things I’ve ever seen on television.

The Stars Over Texas Jamboree, held this month on the second Thursday of the month, offers a Gospel edition featuring Bridgett Huffhines, Lew Smith, LaNelle Gallant, Tommy Ryan and the Singing Seniors at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Lee Lockwood Library and Museum, 2801 W. Waco Drive. $14, $12 for those 65 and older.

Miami University musicologist Tammy Kernodle will highlight the women who used songs and music to advance freedom and civil rights in her musical program “She Sang Freedom,” presented Thursday night at Baylor University’s Bennett Auditorium.

I’ve occasionally written in this column about the years I played music in Austin and my fondness for the people with whom I played. At our peak we were playing probably three or four nights a week and loving it. And why not? We were working in the city that was even then known everywhere as “the live music capital of the world.” We made enough to pay the bills (or most of them at least) and were, snide remarks aside, professionals.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

With its title tongue-in-cheekily evoking “I, Claudius,” another epic tale of madness and debauchery, the dramatic comedy “I, Tonya” revisits — with verve, intelligence, scathing humor and more than a touch of sadness — the bizarre 1994 attack on figure skater Nancy Kerrigan, by goons associated with the camp of Kerrigan’s athletic rival, Tonya Harding.

WASHINGTON — As people gear up for the “Black Panther” movie, Ta-Nehisi Coates wants them to check out the original source, Marvel’s Black Panther comic book, where he’s booting up a massive outer space adventure for the king of Wakanda.

The following movies are showing at first-run theaters Regal Jewel 16 (RJ16), AMC Classic Galaxy 16 (CG16) and the Waco Hippodrome (WH). Letter grades for movies are from advance reviews; an NR means a movie was not reviewed.

A new truck proves the focal point for dreams and endurance in the Waco Civic Theatre production of the musical “Hands on a Hardbody,” which heads into its second weekend with performances at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the theater, 1517 Lake Air Drive. $20 and $18 for Friday and Saturday, $18 and $16 for Thursday and Sunday.

“Something’s comin’ / I don’t know what it is / But it is gonna be great.” So sings Tony when he’s overcome by the premonition that something big is about to happen to him. And of course that something big is meeting Maria, a name that instantly becomes the most beautiful sound he ever heard.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

A spelling competition tests a girl’s mettle in the Jubilee Theatre production of “Akeelah and the Bee,” performed at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the theater, 1319 N. 15th St. $12, $10 students and senior adults, $7 children 11 and younger.

Italian astronomer Galileo took a considerable amount of heat for daring to assert that the Earth was not the center of the solar system. His ideas ran him afoul of no less than the Pope, and in a dramatic confrontation the astronomer was grudgingly forced to take it all back. Time, however, proved him right.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

John Erick Dowdle and Drew Dowdle, the brothers who created the six-part miniseries “Waco” that debuts Wednesday night on the Paramount Network, confess they were asked to name their series on the 1993 Branch Davidian raid, siege and fire anything but “Waco.”

My father, who’s in his mid-80s and two years a widower, recently moved from the house in the Dallas area in which he’d lived for 50 years to a retirement apartment here in Waco. It was a tough transition, exacerbated by an unexpected stay in the hospital which made acclimating to his new surroundings even harder.

Less a movie than a conjuring, “The Shape of Water” plunges viewers into a mossy, aquamarine world of dreams and taboo desires, its contours as a wistful fable adjusted more than slightly for very real, present-day concerns.

Waco country singer Holly Tucker is adding a second verse to the song of Texas musicians helping in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, thanks to a donated guitar and the goodwill — and signatures — of more than two dozen musicians.

Could it be that Hugh Grant was born to play a villainous dandy in a kid’s movie? He certainly seems to be having the time of his life hamming it up in “Paddington 2” as a pretentious, has-been actor who’s now relegated to dressing up like a spaniel for dog food commercials. His delight is contagious.

Times are tough all over, as the saying goes, and this is certainly true for many of the nation’s leading museums. Less than a year ago the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, arguably the country’s premier repository of great art, was looking at a deficit of around $40 million. As a result, the museum had to postpone ambitious expansion plans, curtail temporary exhibitions and cut about 90 people from its staff.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

A new year stretches ahead, but for three WACO-FM radio personalities, it’s prefaced by 25 years at the same station.