Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

Country/Americana singer-songwriter Chris Knight is admiring the fall foliage at his farm near Slaughters, Kentucky, while talking about his Thursday night show at the Waco Hippodrome.

A couple of weeks ago the Moscow Ballet’s traveling production of “The Nutcracker” came through Waco. Like many touring companies that stage the ballet, it used local children to dance several of the parts, and my daughter got to be in two numbers.

For local Texas country music fans, Christmas may have come a little early this year in the form of Winterfest, which tops three nights of country music with such performers as Roger Creager, Josh Abbott, William Clark Green, Waco’s Holly Tucker, Reckless Kelly and Micky and the Motorcars.

Weather was the determining W for last year’s Waco Wonderland with suddenly cold temperatures and rain forcing cancellation of the Waco Christmas parade and delaying Saturday’s opening by a few hours.

The Waco Civic Theatre is more Doyle than Dickens this month, but the tone is still light and entertaining as the theater turns to comedy with Ken Ludwig’s “Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery.”

Through a series of rather unexpected events, I found myself early last Saturday morning sitting in a deer blind out in the vastness of southwest Texas. The utter stillness in a place like that at daybreak is unlike anything I’d experienced before.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

If you’re still looking for a place to have a Thanksgiving meal, here’s a short list of places that we found would be open on Thanksgiving Day.

Dallas artist Erika Huddleston found Waco Creek continually surprised her in the seven months she painted the stream, disappearing from public view at times, resurfacing in hard concrete channels at others.

Jesus Christ, Superstar. That pretty well sums up the attitude of the art world just now. Last week in New York, a portrait that was probably (depending on whom you ask) painted by Leonardo da Vinci about 520 years ago went under the gavel at Christie’s. When the last bid came in and the auctioneer said “Sold,” no one in the room could quite believe what they had witnessed. With the attached fees, an anonymous buyer had spent $450 million — almost half a billion dollars — on a painting called “Salvator Mundi,” Savior of the World. It is far and away the most expensive painting ever sold.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

Mavis Staples seems to grow in stature the longer she keeps chronicling America and its contemporary woes. Her constant frame of reference — the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and her family’s proud role as musical pathfinders in those tumultuous years — is useful as she addresses today’s troubled racial waters.

It’s hard for us cynical souls to walk into a movie advertised with the tagline “Choose kindness” and not shudder in trepidation. What sentimental hooey is this? What new hellish circle of cheese awaits now?

Much attention has been devoted to this year being the centennial of the U.S. entry into World War I. It’s a date certainly worth commemorating as American participation tipped the balance of that ghastly conflict in favor of the Allied Powers and set the stage for vast changes that shaped the remainder of the 20th century.

Baylor University chairman of museum studies Kenneth Hafertepe will talk about early Texas buildings, including some in Waco, in a Historic Waco Foundation lecture at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the Hoffmann House, 810 S. Fourth St. Free and open to the public.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

For the Central Texas Choral Society’s fall concert, director David Guess opted to shift from performance of major choral works to a varied selection of songs drawn from the 5-year-old choir’s past performances.

In May 1917, just a few weeks after the United States entered World War I, a motion picture called “The Spirit of ’76” debuted in Chicago. It was advertised as “a historical romance dealing with the American Revolution and its causes,” and its depiction of the British was particularly negative.

The missed and unseen connections of life form the subject of Baylor Theatre’s “This Random World,” which continues its run with performances at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Baylor’s Hooper-Schaefer Fine Arts Center. $20, $17 for students, faculty, staff.

Editor’s note: Nibbles is Access Waco’s bi-weekly mini-profile of Waco-area restaurants and food trucks that are new or have had a major change in menu or operations.

When soprano Renee Fleming stands before a full Waco Hall on Tuesday night, she won’t be the only one singing, though the others in the audience will sing just in their hearts and minds.

If the windows of some downtown Waco storefronts seem artsier than usual this month, it’s intentional, thanks to the second appearance of Central Texas Artists’ Collective “Ekphrasis” art show.

Americana singer-songwriter Drew Holcomb looks forward to a return to Common Grounds on Saturday night, the Waco venue that he and his band the Neighbors have called home in recent visits, but it’s not as enticing as what follows later this fall: a two-week tour with Willie Nelson.